FFWPT: The Dirty Dozen: 12 Foods You Should Always Buy Organic

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The Dirty Dozen: 12 Foods You Should Always Buy Organic

The Environmental Working Group released its 2015 report on pesticide residue in fruits and vegetables on Wednesday.

February 25, 2015

Willy Blackmore is TakePart’s Food editor.

When it comes to buying fruit, comparing organic with conventionally grown options can be like apples and oranges—even when all you’re trying to buy is apples.

A pound of apples costs roughly between $1 and $1.50, according to the most recent data from the USDA. If you want to go organic, you’ll pay about $1 more per pound.

You could make a case for the apples being worth more, however, because you’re buying a not insignificant amount of pesticides with that fruit, according to analysis of government data by the Environmental Working Group. In the latest iteration of the Dirty Dozen, released Wednesday, apples once again topped the list of the 12 fruits and vegetables (well, 14, really) that retain the highest amount of pesticides and other toxic agricultural chemicals.

According to the accompanying report, two-thirds of the more than 3,000 produce samples analyzed by the USDA tested positive for pesticide residue. A study published earlier this month by the journal Environmental Health Perspectives found that eating organic reduced people’s exposure to pesticides—but that even sticking to an all-organic diet could still result in some pesticide intake. Chemicals used in agriculture can have severe health effects on agricultural workers, and there are concerns that low-level, long-term exposure could contribute to the development of chronic diseases such as cancer and autism.

So if you’re a budget-conscious shopper—and who isn’t, really?—but aren’t looking for a good deal on some value-added pesticides, that extra dollar per pound for apples is well spent. The same goes for peaches, nectarines, strawberries. and grapes, which round out the top five. And the consumer-friendly guide will show you where to make up for your more expensive organic purchases with the Clean Fifteen, a list of those items that bear the least amount of residue. Avocados, which top the less toxic list, are nearly pesticide-free even when conventionally grown; just 1 percent of the fruit sampled showed remnants of farming chemicals.

“We are saying, eat your fruits and vegetables,” Sonya Lunder, EWG’s senior analyst, said in a statement. “But know which ones have the highest amounts of pesticides so you can opt for the organic versions, if available and affordable, or grab a snack off the Clean Fifteen.”

Dirty Dozen

Apples
Peaches
Nectarines
Strawberries
Grapes
Celery
Spinach
Sweet bell peppers
Cucumbers
Cherry tomatoes
Snap peas (imported)
Potatoes
Hot peppers
Kale and collard greens

Clean Fifteen

Avocados
Sweet corn
Pineapples
Cabbage
Sweet peas (frozen)
Onions
Asparagus
Mangos
Papayas
Kiwi
Eggplant
Grapefruit
Cantaloupe
Cauliflower
Sweet potatoes

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FFWPT: Why Dehydration Is Making You Fat And Sick

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Why Dehydration Is Making You Fat And Sick

Digestive, skin, bladder and kidney problems, fatigue and headache are just some of the adverse effects from not drinking enough water. We need it as much as air we breathe in! It’s not a joke.
Did you know that when you start feeling thristy your body is already dehydrated? The best practice is to sip water throughout a day. Have it always handy!

If you’re not a morning person, have two glasses of water right after you wake up. It will boost up your blood pressure to normal levels, and it’s way healthier than having your first coffee on an empty stomach.

Also, don’t think that sweetened juices, soda or tea will hydrate you as well as water does. It’s actually the opposite! Sugar, as well as salt, makes your body waste precious water just to clean it out from your system. And if you love your coffee, make sure to drink one extra glass of water for every cup you have.

And as an added bonus, drinking water speeds up your metabolism and makes you feel more ‘full’. You will eat less once you start drinking more! It’s the safest and healthiest way to loose some weight.

Why Dehydration Is Making You Fat And Sick
Source: Rsvlts via Memolition

– See more at: http://www.thinkinghumanity.com/2014/05/why-dehydration-is-making-you-fat-and-sick.html?m=1#sthash.tlx8QO0v.dpuf

FFWPT: Paleo Diet Linked to Decreased Colorectal Cancer

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Paleo Diet Linked to Decreased Colorectal Cancer

Paleo Diet Linked to Decreased Colorectal Cancer | The Paleo Diet

According to research recently conducted at Emory University in Atlanta, adherence to the Paleo Diet may significantly slash colorectal cancer rates.1 For their study, published online last month in the American Journal of Epidemiology, researchers examined the dietary habits of 2,301 men and women, 30 to 74 years old. Participants were categorized based on how closely their diets resembled the Paleo Diet. Overall, 564 participants developed colorectal adenoma, a benign tumor of the colon or rectum. Scientists classify colorectal adenoma as a precursor to colorectal cancer.2 For women with diets most closely resembling the Paleo Diet, tumor rates fell 29 percent compared to control groups. For men, Paleo Diet benefits were even more pronounced, with tumor rates falling 51 percent.

For those who study and follow the Paleo lifestyle, these results are hardly surprising. As the Paleo Diet becomes increasingly popular, however, it’s also more frequently misrepresented. Just last week, for example, Janet Helm of US News & World Report wrote about Paleo, “I don’t support this restrictive, meat-heavy diet that bans so many nutritious foods, such as dairy, grains and beans.”3 The Paleo Diet, of course, includes healthy animal foods, but disparagingly calling it “meat-heavy,” ignores the fact that it’s very vegetable-heavy. Could the Paleo Diet’s high vegetable level explain its protective effects against colorectal cancer?

Vegetables, of course, contain fiber and Western diets contain far less fiber than those of our Paleolithic ancestors. Whereas mean daily fiber intakes in the US range from 10 to 18 grams, our Paleolithic ancestors consumed upwards of 100 grams daily.4, 5 Some 40 years ago, an Irish surgeon named Denis Burkitt introduced the theory that increased consumption of dietary fiber decreases colorectal cancer risks.6 Burkitt’s theory gained traction and was eventually accepted as common knowledge, but a number of cohort studies and randomized controlled trials in recent decades have strongly challenged his contention.7 Although many prominent institutions, including the Harvard School of Public Health, no longer accept Burkitt’s theory, it may be premature to conclude that fiber consumption and colorectal cancer are unrelated.8

In an article published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, anthropologist Jeff Leach points out that fiber levels in studies challenging Burkitt’s theory, even for participants in the uppermost quintiles, are still far below evolutionary standards.9 We should also acknowledge fiber’s beneficial effects with respect to gut microbiome health. Increased fiber consumption promotes decreased intestinal inflammation, decreased body weight, and decreased obesity-induced chronic inflammation.10 While the causes of colorectal cancer are not entirely known, the Mayo Clinic lists inflammatory intestinal conditions, insulin resistance, obesity, smoking, heavy alcohol consumption, and sedentary lifestyle all as factors that may increase colorectal cancer risks.11

So what does this new research associating the Paleo Diet with decreased colorectal cancer really tell us? Does the Paleo Diet’s vegetable-heavy, and thus fiber-heavy, aspect account for this benefit? We cannot say so definitively. We can say, however, that the Paleo Diet is more than just a diet. It’s a lifestyle that promotes wellness and prevents disease. Most diseases, especially cancer, have multiple roots, the combination of which eventually grows into disease. This recent research is a testament to the holistic nature of the Paleo Diet and Paleo lifestyle, encompassing many informed decisions, which likely collectively protect against colorectal cancer.

Christopher James Clark, B.B.A.

Christopher James Clark, B.B.A. is an award-winning writer, consultant, and chef with specialized knowledge in nutritional science and healing cuisine. He has a Business Administration degree from the University of Michigan and formerly worked as a revenue management analyst for a Fortune 100 company. For the past decade-plus, he has been designing menus, recipes, and food concepts for restaurants and spas, coaching private clients, teaching cooking workshops worldwide, and managing the kitchen for a renowned Greek yoga resort. Clark is the author of the critically acclaimed, award-winning book, Nutritional Grail.

REFERENCES

1 Whalen, K., et al. (2014). Paleolithic and Mediterranean Diet Pattern Scores and Risk of Incident, Sporadic Colorectal Adenomas. American Journal of Epidemiology. Retrieved from http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2014/10/17/aje.kwu235.abstract

2 Srivastava, S., et al. (May 2001). Biomarkers for early detection of colon cancer. Clinical Cancer Research, 7(5). Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11350874

3 Helm, Janet. (November 5, 2014). 8 Positive Outcomes of the Paleo Trend. US News & World Report. Retrieved from https://www.yahoo.com/health/8-positive-outcomes-of-the-paleo-trend-101439975577.html

4 Clemens, R., et al. (July 2012). Filling America’s Fiber Intake Gap: Summary of a Roundtable to Probe Realistic Solutions with a Focus on Grain-Based Foods. Journal of Nutrition, 142(7). Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22649260

5 Leach, JD. (January 2007). Evolutionary perspective on dietary intake of fibre and colorectal cancer. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 61(1). Retrieved from Evolutionary perspective on dietary intake of fibre and colorectal cancer

6 Burkitt, DP. (July 1971). Epidemiology of cancer of the colon and rectum. Cancer, 28(1). Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/5165022

7 Lawlor, DA, and Ness, AR. (2003). Commentary: The rough world of nutritional epidemiology: Does dietary fibre prevent large bowel cancer? International Journal of Epidemiology, 32(2). Retrieved from http://ije.oxfordjournals.org/content/32/2/239.full

8 Nutrition Source, Harvard School of Public Health. Fiber and Colon Cancer: Following the Scientific Trail. Retrieved from http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/fiber-and-colon-cancer/

9 Ibid, Burkitt

10 Kuo, SM. (January 2013). The Interplay Between Fiber and the Intestinal Microbiome in the Inflammatory Response. Advances in Nutrition, 4(1). Retrieved from http://advances.nutrition.org/content/4/1/16.full

11 Mayo Clinic Staff. (August 2013). Diseases and Conditions: Colon Cancer: Risk Factors. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/colon-cancer/basics/risk-factors/con-20031877

Happy St. Patrick’s Day

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Have a safe and warm St. Patrick’s Day Weekend!

Warm Regards,

James Bonardi, MPT

Dr. Sean McLaughlin, DC

 

PS….some info about St. Patrick’s Day:

In Ireland

According to legend, Saint Patrick used the shamrock, a three-leaved plant, to explain the Holy Trinity to the pre-Christian Irish people.

Saint Patrick’s feast day, as a kind of national day, was already being celebrated by the Irish in Europe in the ninth and tenth centuries. In later times he became more and more widely known as the patron of Ireland.[17] Saint Patrick’s feast day was finally placed on the universal liturgical calendar in the Catholic Church due to the influence of Waterford-born Franciscan scholar Luke Wadding[18] in the early 1600s. Saint Patrick’s Day thus became a holy day of obligation for Roman Catholics in Ireland. The church calendar avoids the observance of saints’ feasts during certain solemnities, moving the saint’s day to a time outside those periods. Saint Patrick’s Day is occasionally affected by this requirement, when 17 March falls during Holy Week. This happened in 1940, when Saint Patrick’s Day was observed on 3 April in order to avoid it coinciding with Palm Sunday, and again in 2008, where it was officially observed on 14 March (15 March being used for St. Joseph, which had to be moved from 19 March), although the secular celebration still took place on 17 March. Saint Patrick’s Day will not fall within Holy Week again until 2160.[19][20] (In other countries, St. Patrick’s feast day is also 17 March, but liturgical celebration is omitted when impeded by Sunday or by Holy Week.)

A St Patrick’s Day religious procession in Downpatrick, 2010

Girls playing Irish folk music during a St Patrick’s Day parade in Dublin, 2010
Everyone's Irish on 17 March

Sign on a beam in Dublin’s Guinness Storehouse, a commercial museum promoting the drinking of Guinness stout on St Patrick’s Day

In 1903, Saint Patrick’s Day became an official public holiday in Ireland. This was thanks to the Bank Holiday (Ireland) Act 1903, an act of the United Kingdom Parliament introduced by Irish Member of Parliament James O’Mara.[21] O’Mara later introduced the law that required that pubs and bars be closed on 17 March after drinking got out of hand, a provision that was repealed in the 1970s. The first Saint Patrick’s Day parade held in the Irish Free State was held in Dublin in 1931 and was reviewed by the then Minister of Defence Desmond Fitzgerald. Although secular celebrations now exist, the holiday remains a religious observance in Ireland, for both the Roman Catholic Church and the Church of Ireland.

In the mid-1990s the government of the Republic of Ireland began a campaign to use Saint Patrick’s Day to showcase Ireland and its culture.[22] The government set up a group called St Patrick’s Festival, with the aim to:

  • Offer a national festival that ranks amongst all of the greatest celebrations in the world and promote excitement throughout Ireland via innovation, creativity, grassroots involvement, and marketing activity.
  • Provide the opportunity and motivation for people of Irish descent, (and those who sometimes wish they were Irish) to attend and join in the imaginative and expressive celebrations.
  • Project, internationally, an accurate image of Ireland as a creative, professional and sophisticated country with wide appeal, as we approach the new millennium.[23]

The first Saint Patrick’s Festival was held on 17 March 1996. In 1997, it became a three-day event, and by 2000 it was a four-day event. By 2006, the festival was five days long; more than 675,000 people attended the 2009 parade. Overall 2009’s five day festival saw close to 1 million visitors, who took part in festivities that included concerts, outdoor theatre performances, and fireworks.[24] Skyfest forms the centrepiece of the festival.

The topic of the 2004 St. Patrick’s Symposium was “Talking Irish”, during which the nature of Irish identity, economic success, and the future were discussed. Since 1996, there has been a greater emphasis on celebrating and projecting a fluid and inclusive notion of “Irishness” rather than an identity based around traditional religious or ethnic allegiance. The week around Saint Patrick’s Day usually involves Irish language speakers using more Irish during seachtain na Gaeilge (“Irish Week”).[citation needed]

As well as Dublin, many other cities, towns, and villages in Ireland hold their own parades and festivals, including Cork, Belfast, Derry, Galway, Kilkenny, Limerick, and Waterford.

The biggest celebrations outside Dublin are in Downpatrick, County Down, where Saint Patrick is rumoured to be buried. In 2004, according to Down District Council, the week-long St. Patrick’s Festival had more than 2,000 participants and 82 floats, bands, and performers and was watched by more than 30,000 people.[citation needed]

The shortest St Patrick’s Day parade in the world takes place in Dripsey, Cork. The parade lasts just 100 yards and travels between the village’s two pubs.[25]

Christian leaders in Ireland have expressed concern about the secularisation of St Patrick’s Day. In The Word magazine’s March 2007 issue, Fr. Vincent Twomey wrote, “It is time to reclaim St Patrick’s Day as a church festival.” He questioned the need for “mindless alcohol-fuelled revelry” and concluded that “it is time to bring the piety and the fun together.”[26]

Fairfield Wellness and Physical Therapy and 360 Gym at The Caldwell Street Fair

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The Fairfield Wellness and Physical Therapy Center made it to The Caldwell Street Fair to mingle with neighbors and enjoy a beautiful Autumn Day. Sean McLaughlin, DC and Jim Bonardi, PT spent hours talking with old and new friends to represent their new office, as well as the state-of-the-art Gym: 360 Fitness – Performance – Sports. The Street Fair was a huge success!!! Congratulations to the Caldwell Rotary Club (Dr. Sean McLaughlin’s Alma Mater Rotary Group)